Three surveys assess Covid’s impact on our health

Three surveys published in recent weeks have gauged the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on our dietary and supplement habits, our use of technology and our mental health. Here we present a quick survey of the findings in all three studies.

According to a survey of 13,000 people in 24 countries conducted by OnePoll on behalf of the Council for Responsible Nutrition and Herbalife Nutrition, eight in 10 US citizens believe their health is “work in progress”. Some 89% of respondents worldwide are taking steps to improve their health, with 81% reporting that the pandemic helped to kickstart them.

Vitamins and supplements are a priority for many; when asked about how their health goals have changed, half said they are more focused on eating healthier, including supplementing their diet with vitamins & minerals, with the average respondent spending around US$286 each year. However, only 69% reported feeling knowledgeable about the health benefits and 77% would like to know more. Some 30% are most likely to get information about vitamins and supplements from internet searches, media and social media, followed by consulting with their doctor (27%).

Source: OnePoll / Herbalife / CRN

According to a survey from Saudi-based cultural institute Ithra, 91% of people globally are spending more time online because of the pandemic, and 44% are worried about the impact of internet and smartphone use on their health. Respondents in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia appear most worried, with 74% and 56% respectively fearing the negative consequences of the internet on wellbeing vs 27% in Europe and Central Asia. Consistent with their increased use of devices, younger people are experiencing more physical symptoms than their elders, with 50% of Gen Z respondents complaining of tiredness, poor sleep and headaches.

And, finally, a study published in BJPsych Open revealed the mental health of adults aged over 50 has been significantly compromised by Covid-19. University of Surrey researchers analysed data in 5,331 participants from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. Self-reported depression in June and July 2020 were compared with baseline data from 2-3 years prior. Some 26% met the criteria for clinical depression during the pandemic vs 14% in previous years. Women were found to be at a much higher risk, as well as people living alone and those with long-term health conditions. Women living in an urban environment showed a larger increase in depression symptoms than those in more rural areas. The research also found that individuals at the younger end of the 50+ population suffered more.

In just 2 weeks, you can join Nicholas and a panel of industry experts at our North American e-Conference 2021Sponsored by Catalent, you can look forward to hearing about consumer shopping behaviours, the non-prescription imperative, natural channel retail world and much more. To register, or for further details, please contact elizabeth.bernos@NicholasHall.com.

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