CHPA Report & Conference

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Last week, to tie in with its Annual Executive Conference (AEC), the Consumer Healthcare Products Association released a white paper that found, on average, every dollar spent on OTC medicines saves the US healthcare system around US$7.20, resulting in nearly US$146bn in savings annually. CHPA President & CEO Scott Melville commented that the “healthcare system undervalues the contribution of our industry’s products”, and explained that the research will support legislative initiatives promoting financial incentives for consumers to buy OTCs using health insurance flexible spending plans.

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Done in partnership with IRI, the study was conducted in part to raise the profile of OTC products in USA. It found that around 90% of people who buy an OTC product for a condition would seek medical care if the OTC product had not been available. The study analysed nine OTC categories to identify the primary contributors of cost savings to the healthcare system. The categories include allergy, analgesics, antifungals, cough / cold / flu, lower GI, medicated skin, upper GI, sleep and smoking control. The research showed that OTC medicines provide additional value through expanded access to more than 27mn consumers who would otherwise forgo treatment – more than 13mn Americans for allergies alone.

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Writing from Florida, Nicholas Hall said: “Trust was a major theme of CHPA’s Annual Executive Conference … Edelman presented data showing that consumer trust of healthcare is improving after plummeting last year. Speakers agreed that trust goes beyond building brands. In a session I moderated on Tuesday, Bayer CH President Heiko Schipper said that our industry needs to, “articulate better what we do. We are doing a lot of good things like being responsible for the environment and employee diversity”.

Taisho Executive VP Ken Uehara agreed: “Trust can’t be built instantly, certainly for our company, it’s our most important asset.” Alan Main, Executive VP, Sanofi, commented that in the past it was about building the brand: “I still think the brand comes first in people’s minds, but we have to look after the brands, not just for five years but for 30-40 years.” Katie Devine, who is moving into a new leadership role at J&J, said companies can choose not to reply to every tweet, but should maintain a fact-based conversation about being responsible in the treatment of employees, the population and planet.

Other questions I addressed to the Leadership Panel concerned the lack of Rx-to-OTC switch (Alan Main said switch has an important role to play in the future of self-care); CBD (all panellists believe it will develop well beyond the current US$500mn quoted by IRI, although Katie’s point, “I know how to switch from Rx to OTC, but not from illegal to legal”, was well taken); and the number one item on their wish list — speed to market and improved innovation were favourites … I liked the concentrated format of this year’s AEC, with two half-day sessions, which allowed time for networking, and was proud to have been one of three Preferred Sponsors of the meeting, in the good company of Google and the Emerson Group.”

Nicholas Hall will discuss the latest Market Trends and Innovation impacting the CHC market at our annual North American CHC Conference (26-27 June) in collaboration with our partners EverythingHealth. As well as the chance to network with other industry players, you can hear from Google, Jefferson Health, Persuadable Research and other industry experts. Don’t hesitate — book before 31 March to save with our generous early-bird booking discount! To find out more about this event, please contact elizabeth.bernos@NicholasHall.com.

Perrigo to revive flagging OTC allergy sales?

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According to the latest MAT Q1 2018 data, global growth of OTC allergy remedies has slowed to just +0.2%, compared with a rate of +3.7% in the year-ago MAT Q1 2017 period, and +10.3% in the MAT Q1 2016 period. A drop-off in Rx-to-OTC switch activity has been a key factor, so last week’s news that Perrigo has signed an agreement with Merck & Co for exclusive rights to market, sell and distribute a non-prescription version of Nasonex (mometasone furoate monohydrate) in the US will be a welcome boost for the category.

Financial terms were not disclosed and the deal is subject to receipt of all necessary regulatory approvals. Nasonex is currently available on prescription only in USA, where it is marketed by Merck & Co. The corticosteroid anti-inflammatory nasal spray is indicated for the treatment of the symptoms of seasonal allergic or perennial allergic rhinitis in people aged 18+ years. In those markets where the product is available OTC, such as Australia, it is marketed by Bayer.

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Perrigo has often been first to launch private label equivalents of recently switched OTC brands – generic versions of Flonase and Zegerid OTC were launched in 2016, while a copy of Nexium 24HR was launched by the company last summer – but this deal marks a new phase for Perrigo into switching brands.

As Perrigo Executive VP & President, Consumer Healthcare Americas, Jeff Needham, commented: “This product in-licence is the first of its kind for Perrigo. As other similar products that have previously switched from prescription to OTC status, we are working diligently to bring this important product to consumers and customers more quickly than the average 5-year OTC switch timeframe. This strategic investment into the OTC category creates an innovative product offering for Perrigo. We expect to execute the Rx-OTC-switch, fully penetrate this market with a branded offering and provide a future store brand alternative.” 

Comment from Ian Crook, Managing Editor, Nicholas Hall’s Reports: Nasonex enjoys dynamic growth in the handful of markets where it has been switched to OTC by Bayer and generated sales of US$23mn in 2017 (+28% CAGR 2013-17). In the brand’s largest market, Australia (where it switched in 2014), award-winning advertising helped it build a strong presence among consumers; it ranked 4th with sales of US$10mn (+5%) in 2017, comfortably the No.1 in the nasal sprays segment. How the brand will fare in the USA — if and when Perrigo successfully navigates the switch process — remains to be seen. Nasal steroid switches in the USA have historically driven high growth among allergy remedies, but later arrivals like Nasonex are unlikely to make as big a splash as previous INS switches.

Perrigo is one of the Top 20 OTC players profiled in the 2018 version of our bestselling OTC YearBook. This essential annual report also gives an extensive, up-to-date overview of the OTC industry across the globe, including reviews of M&A activity, Top 15 markets and major OTC categories, plus much more. For more information or to order your copy, please contact melissa.lee@NicholasHall.com.

 

MAT Q1 2018: 5 key trends & developments

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Our latest Q1 2018 trend reports on the OTC market at global, regional and Top 20 level are now available on the OTC DASHBOARD website. Here we highlight some of the key trends & developments that have emerged in the latest data.

  1. Growth draining out of allergy remedies: In the MAT Q1 2018 period, global growth of OTC allergy remedies slowed to just +0.2%. Compare this with a rate of +3.7% in the year-ago MAT Q1 2017 period, and +10.3% in the MAT Q1 2016 period. This gradual slowdown, caused primarily by a drop-off in Rx-to-OTC switch activity, has been one of several key factors in the continued low growth of the global OTC market (+4.1%) in Q1.
  2. J&J edges ahead of Sanofi: The latest MAT Q1 2018 data indicates that J&J is now the No.3 OTC marketer globally, marginally ahead of Sanofi and just behind Bayer. Every one of the Top 5 OTC marketers grew at a rate below that of the global OTC market in the MAT Q1 2018 period, indicating the difficulty in finding new growth opportunities and the continued emphasis on M&A.
  3. Has probiotics growth peaked? Though it remains high at +9.2% in the year to end-March 2018, the global growth of the probiotics category has slowed over the past year, when compared with a rate of +14.0% in the year-ago MAT Q1 2017 period, and +10.8% in the MAT Q1 2016 period. Innovation and expansion of the category into new countries and niches, such as diabetes, have fuelled its growth thus far, but we’ll be keeping a close eye over coming quarters to see if this trend is a temporary blip or the start of a long-term slowdown.
  4. Where’s the growth potential? 1. Adjacencies: OTC marketers are increasingly looking to build new consumer healthcare adjacencies, either via switch – in the case of erectile dysfunction and Pfizer’s Viagra Connect – or new product innovation, in the case of medical cannabis. Though we don’t yet include sales of medical cannabis products in OTC DASHBOARD, we do track developments in this category closely in both our innovation database, OTC New Products Tracker, and regulatory newsletter, OTC.NewDirections.
  5. Where’s the growth potential? 2. New territories: Coverage of the OTC market in the Middle East & Africa is one of the main benefits of being an OTC DASHBOARD subscriber, and looking at the latest Q1 data highlights the importance of this region to the relative success of GSK and RB. GSK performed better than the rest of the Top 5, with its CCA brand Otrivin moving up the Middle East & Africa rankings to the No.3 spot in Q1 after double-digit growth, while global No.6 RB (+4.4%) outperformed the global OTC rate thanks in part to the high MEA growth of Gaviscon and Strepsils.

Explore how we can innovate (and manage the impact of regulatory challenges) at our 1st OTC.NewDirections Executive Conference in London on 12th September 2018Where Innovation meets Regulation. Nicholas Hall and Nina Stimson will be joined by speakers from Medical Brands, Angelini and Arqus Advisory among others to review, discuss and debate major issues impacting the competitive landscape in an industry in which the regulatory goalposts are continually moving. Sessions span New Product Opportunities, Regulatory Affairs (including the potential impact of Brexit across the EU), Medical Devices, Switch, Digital Marketing, New Distribution and e-Commerce. Don’t hesitate — book before 31 July to save with our early-bird discount! For more information on this pivotal meeting, please contact Lianne.Hill@nicholashall.com

OTCs in Action Episode 16: Probiotics vs Peanut Allergies

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Decades from now, could the peanut-free table in school lunch rooms be a social relic of the early 2000s?

Today, peanuts are the most common cause of fatality owing to food-induced anaphylaxis. However, there is very exciting news that OTC probiotics may play a role in eliminating the allergy for many children. Researchers at Murdoch Children’s Research Institute in Parkville, Australia, have announced the successful trial of a treatment for peanut allergies. In the study, researchers gave more than 60 peanut allergic children either a placebo or a dose of a probiotic (Lactobacillus rhamnosus), together with peanut protein in increasing amounts over an 18-month period. The result: More than 80% of children who received the oral immunotherapy treatment were able to tolerate peanuts at the end of the trial, compared to less than 4% of the placebo group. This is 20 times higher than the natural rate of resolution for peanut allergy. According to the announcement, “23 of 28 (82.1%) probiotic treated children and one of 28 (3.6%) placebo-treated children were able to include peanut in their diet at the end of the trial.”

Lead researcher, Professor Mimi Tang, said the study results are extremely exciting as they could potentially provide an effective treatment for food allergy: “In the study the combined delivery of probiotic and oral immunotherapy was a safe and effective treatment for peanut allergy; however, it is important to point out that this treatment must only be given under close medical supervision as we are giving peanut to children who are allergic to peanut and children did have allergic reactions. Nevertheless, the likelihood of success was high – if nine children were given probiotic and peanut therapy, seven would benefit.”

For more information, visit:

http://www.mcri.edu.au/news/2015/january/peanut-allergy/

OTCs in Action thanks the weekly newsletter, OTC.NewDirections, published by Nicholas Hall & Co, for tracking scientific advancements in healthcare as they are announced.