Perrigo to revive flagging OTC allergy sales?

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According to the latest MAT Q1 2018 data, global growth of OTC allergy remedies has slowed to just +0.2%, compared with a rate of +3.7% in the year-ago MAT Q1 2017 period, and +10.3% in the MAT Q1 2016 period. A drop-off in Rx-to-OTC switch activity has been a key factor, so last week’s news that Perrigo has signed an agreement with Merck & Co for exclusive rights to market, sell and distribute a non-prescription version of Nasonex (mometasone furoate monohydrate) in the US will be a welcome boost for the category.

Financial terms were not disclosed and the deal is subject to receipt of all necessary regulatory approvals. Nasonex is currently available on prescription only in USA, where it is marketed by Merck & Co. The corticosteroid anti-inflammatory nasal spray is indicated for the treatment of the symptoms of seasonal allergic or perennial allergic rhinitis in people aged 18+ years. In those markets where the product is available OTC, such as Australia, it is marketed by Bayer.

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Perrigo has often been first to launch private label equivalents of recently switched OTC brands – generic versions of Flonase and Zegerid OTC were launched in 2016, while a copy of Nexium 24HR was launched by the company last summer – but this deal marks a new phase for Perrigo into switching brands.

As Perrigo Executive VP & President, Consumer Healthcare Americas, Jeff Needham, commented: “This product in-licence is the first of its kind for Perrigo. As other similar products that have previously switched from prescription to OTC status, we are working diligently to bring this important product to consumers and customers more quickly than the average 5-year OTC switch timeframe. This strategic investment into the OTC category creates an innovative product offering for Perrigo. We expect to execute the Rx-OTC-switch, fully penetrate this market with a branded offering and provide a future store brand alternative.” 

Comment from Ian Crook, Managing Editor, Nicholas Hall’s Reports: Nasonex enjoys dynamic growth in the handful of markets where it has been switched to OTC by Bayer and generated sales of US$23mn in 2017 (+28% CAGR 2013-17). In the brand’s largest market, Australia (where it switched in 2014), award-winning advertising helped it build a strong presence among consumers; it ranked 4th with sales of US$10mn (+5%) in 2017, comfortably the No.1 in the nasal sprays segment. How the brand will fare in the USA — if and when Perrigo successfully navigates the switch process — remains to be seen. Nasal steroid switches in the USA have historically driven high growth among allergy remedies, but later arrivals like Nasonex are unlikely to make as big a splash as previous INS switches.

Perrigo is one of the Top 20 OTC players profiled in the 2018 version of our bestselling OTC YearBook. This essential annual report also gives an extensive, up-to-date overview of the OTC industry across the globe, including reviews of M&A activity, Top 15 markets and major OTC categories, plus much more. For more information or to order your copy, please contact melissa.lee@NicholasHall.com.

 

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2018 Trends: Medical Cannabis

One trend to watch in 2018 is the growing number of medical cannabis consumer healthcare products, with launch activity focused on North America. A recent development was the licensing deal between Level Brands, a marketing and licensing company that provides branding for businesses, and Canadian-based company Isodiol, which commercialises 99%+ pure, bioactive pharmaceutical grade cannabinoids, with products including body balm, tincture, skin care, nano-mist and functional beverages.

Isodiol will work with Level Brands to develop consumer products for kathy ireland Health & Wellness, a licensor to Level Brands, and for Level Brands subsidiary I’M1, a lifestyle brand for men. During the 5-year term of the agreement, Level Brands will receive an initial US$2mn in the form of Isodiol shares, then US$750,000 per quarter (also in the form of Isodiol shares) and a 3% royalty on gross sales. The new Isodiol kathy ireland Health & Wellness and I’M1 products are expected to debut in mid-to-late spring 2018 online and in select retail stores.

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Outside North America, Q4 2017 saw a number of significant developments in the medical cannabis category, which will likely translate into increased launch activity in 2018. In October 2017, biotech start-up CIITECH announced the availability of Herbalica’s non-psychoactive, cannabidiol supplements to UK consumers via www.essentialcannabinoids.co.uk. The range of 5 supplements includes products for anxiety, ovulation pain and insomnia. The CBD compound is considered a powerful anti-inflammatory and anti-anxiety agent, with researchers suggesting it could ease chronic pain. Israeli-based Herbalica’s parent company HerbalTune has developed and supplied a range of therapeutic, botanical products to the local market for the past three years.

In Asia-Pacific, the New Zealand Government introduced a bill earlier this month to legalise medicinal cannabis in the country. The bill seeks to amend the Misuse of Drugs Act to make a specific exemption for any person with a qualifying medical condition to grow, process or use cannabis plants and products for therapeutic purposes, provided they have support from a registered medical practitioner. The move, which follows Australia’s legalisation of medicinal cannabis in 2016, aims to make the ingredient more readily available for those suffering with chronic pain or terminal illness. At the same time, Australia announced that it aims to become the fourth country after Uruguay, Canada and the Netherlands to legalise exports of medicinal cannabis.

OTC in Action Episode 4: OTCs in Excess

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This week, a friend told me how she fought the severe cold that ruined her weekend. Saturday morning she took ibuprofen. A few hours later she took more ibuprofen, then took some aspirin a little while later, knowing that it was too soon to take more ibuprofen. Still suffering at the end of the day, she took some antibiotics that were in the medicine cabinet. This treatment continued throughout the weekend – “I don’t remember how many (brand name ibuprofen) I took but I was still sick!” – until she saw a doctor for proper treatment on Monday.

This college-educated mother of four is your typical adult, trusting that all OTCs are safe and too busy to investigate the risks.

So, OTCs in Action is pleased to report two measures taken to ensure easy access to OTCs, while limiting risk to consumers:

The Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) released its review of cardiovascular risks of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and found that OTC NSAIDs are safe when they are used according to the recommended doses for short durations, as instructed on the labels (somewhat good news for my friend). However, the TGA also noted that inappropriate use or overuse of these medicines can pose a significant health risk (bad news for my friend), and announced a public consultation to explore options to reduce these risks (http://www.tga.gov.au/safety/medicines-review-nsaid.htm#.VDVtGr7IaFI).

Elsewhere in the world, the chances of my friend accidentally overdosing her daughter when treating a sore throat at 3am has been minimised by the FDA’s publication of a Draft Guidance this week. Although not yet a final rule, the FDA’s draft guidance will protect against accidental overdose of liquid acetaminophen by recommending concentration standardisation, container labels and carton labelling, as well as improved packaging. Industry has already voluntarily adopted these guidelines over the past couple of years and acetaminophen overdose rates for children have declined.

On a final note, some other news this week illustrates how, if my friend lived in Cairo, she could have purchased a full course of antibiotics as soon as she felt ill. Egypt Today has published the following article (http://egypttoday.com/blog/2014/09/01/abusing-antibiotics/) about the abuse of antibiotics, stating that:

[Antibiotics are] widely available over-the-counter at Egyptian pharmacies, and often regarded as a fast remedy for the fever and flu. They’re given to children by concerned mothers, and gulped down by adults who don’t want to bother or don’t have the money to first consult a doctor for a prescription. But the rampant misuse of antibiotics is actually endangering our health.

The pharmacies in Downtown Cairo are about as numerous as the kiosks and cafés. If anyone in the neighbourhood is running errands, they can stop there to pick up some grape-scented shampoo or a new toothbrush. If they come down with a respiratory infection or fever, they can also pick up some powerful antibiotics if they just complain to the pharmacist behind the counter of their pains and answer a few simple questions. They may realise popping antibiotics isn’t exactly healthy. But most probably don’t know that this practice is contributing to antimicrobial resistance, a global problem so serious that the World Health Organization (WHO) says it “threatens the achievements of modern medicine”.

For more news about the regulations, science, business and consumers that send OTCs into Action, visit http://www.NicholasHall.com to learn more about our OTC.Newsflash and OTC.NewDirections weekly e-newsletters.

Hello and best wishes for 2014 from INSIGHT Asia-Pacific

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The start of a new year is the ideal time to reflect on events of the previous 12 months and consider what might happen in the year ahead. INSIGHT Asia-Pacific has done just that in the just-published January edition by asking industry experts to share their views on the major trends & developments and their likely impacts in core regional OTC markets.

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