New Advance In Wearables

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A new soft, flexible microfluidic device sticks on forearm or back skin to measure sweat and show how the body is responding to exercise. The small, simple, low cost device analyses key biomarkers to help a person decide quickly if any adjustments, such as drinking more water or replenishing electrolytes, is needed, or if something is medically wrong.

It is designed for one-time use of a few hours and features a number of innovations including:

• The ability to capture, store and analyse sweat in situ and in real time
• Can quantitatively determine biomarker levels using colorimetric analysis
• A power source is not required to display the results; instead, a smartphone camera and app are used to read the biomarker change

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The device’s sensitivity even enables it to pick up the biomarker for cystic fibrosis and it is hoped that in future it may be used more broadly for disease diagnosis.

Study leader John A. Rogers, professor of materials science and engineering, discussed the device: “The intimate skin interface created by this wearable, skin-like microfluidic system enables new measurement capabilities not possible with the kinds of absorbent pads and sponges currently used in sweat collection.”

The team have studied the efficacy of the device in two groups of cyclists and found it to be both accurate compared to conventional lab analysis and durable in unpredictable environmental conditions. Their findings were published on 23rd November in Science Translational Medicine.

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New Test Launched in European HIV Testing Week

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In its fourth year, and the second time hepatitis testing has been included, European HIV Testing Week is currently in action. Starting on 18th November, and finishing a week later, testing week is spanning the length and breadth of the continent with partners participating from over 50 European countries.

Prior to this, the world’s fastest HIV self-test kit went on sale last week in order to relieve pressure on overcrowded sexual health clinics.

bioLytical Laboratories, renowned for their production of rapid infectious disease tests, has developed the INSTI HIV Self Test, following research revealing that over 103,000 people are living with HIV in the UK and an estimated 18,100 remain unaware of their positive status.

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It was reported recently that funding cuts have resulted in clinic closures across the country meaning the pressure is on for remaining clinics. Failure to fund routine testing in GP surgeries is leading to late diagnosis when early treatment of the disease is highly beneficial.

With one prick to a finger and a droplet of blood, the INSTI HIV Self Test provides immediate results and is over 99% accurate. Other home testing kits can take up to 20 minutes to produce a result, and in some cases laboratory test results can take several days or weeks.

The INSTI HIV Self Test kit also includes a resource card on where to seek help or for those who have general questions on HIV screening.

The test is available now online at www.INSTI-HIVSelfTest.com and costs €29.95 (£25.95) per kit.

WHO expresses interest in new Zika test

Scientists in Singapore have developed a kit that can test for the Dengue, Chikungunya and Zika viruses all at the same time in just two hours.

The three mosquito-borne viruses cause similar symptoms such as rashes and joint pain. Symptoms for the Zika virus are generally mild and go away within a week, causing the disease to be misdiagnosed.

The kit is ready for use and only costs a few dollars to produce. Dr Masafumi Inoue, a senior research scientist at the Agency for Science, Technology & Research’s Experimental Therapeutics Centre confirmed that the World Health Organisation (WHO) has expressed interest.

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Dr Masafumi Inoue is currently compiling clinical data for the health authority before sending the kit over for testing. If the testing is successful, the WHO may use the kit to test for the viruses.

As it is extremely important to quickly distinguish between the three major mosquito-borne viruses, the kit could prove incredibly useful in ensuring patients receive the required treatment and care without delay.

All that is required from the patient is a blood or urine sample. The genetic material of the virus is then extracted to find out what the virus is. The detection process takes two hours, reducing the time by threefold if each of the viruses were to be tested for individually.

The idea to develop the kit came about six months ago when Brazil had been hit badly by a large number of Zika cases.

OTCs in Action Episode 46: Parenting made less stressful … temporarily

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This week’s OTC in Action episode brings back memories of caring for sick babies – agonising over whether to wake them for a temperature reading after a long night of tears, rocking, walking and calls to the paediatrician in the early hours of the morning. It also reminded me of the role temperature plays throughout those early years – the bottle, the bath, etc.

Recently, a panel of healthcare product buyers were likely remembering similar experiences when they voted Tecnimed Family First’s VisioFocus Smart as the Best Product finalist at the ECRM / Drug Store News’ healthcare trade show.

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Source: Munnme.ie

VisioFocus, from Italian company Tecnimed, is able to read temperatures by being pointed at foreheads, bottles and baths – and projecting the temperature on the baby’s skin or object surface. According to the company, in addition to being more hygienic because it does not touch the skin, it does not disturb a child’s sleep.

The temperature reading is also stored in the thermometer’s memory; such a valuable tool when tracking recovery. Its functionality for measuring liquid temperature will also add an extra safety net for nervous new parents.

Now, if only they could develop a device that would project teenagers’ mood swings…

Nicholas Hall’s OTC.NewDirections: FDA rulings in Medical Devices and Dietary Supplements

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Two areas we focus on in our latest OTC.NewDirections bulletin are new regulations for dietary supplements and medical devices. In Canada, quality assurance measures are being introduced for Natural Health Products, while across the border in the US, the FDA has issued guidance to help marketers distinguish between liquid dietary supplements and beverages.

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