2018 Trends: Medical Cannabis

One trend to watch in 2018 is the growing number of medical cannabis consumer healthcare products, with launch activity focused on North America. A recent development was the licensing deal between Level Brands, a marketing and licensing company that provides branding for businesses, and Canadian-based company Isodiol, which commercialises 99%+ pure, bioactive pharmaceutical grade cannabinoids, with products including body balm, tincture, skin care, nano-mist and functional beverages.

Isodiol will work with Level Brands to develop consumer products for kathy ireland Health & Wellness, a licensor to Level Brands, and for Level Brands subsidiary I’M1, a lifestyle brand for men. During the 5-year term of the agreement, Level Brands will receive an initial US$2mn in the form of Isodiol shares, then US$750,000 per quarter (also in the form of Isodiol shares) and a 3% royalty on gross sales. The new Isodiol kathy ireland Health & Wellness and I’M1 products are expected to debut in mid-to-late spring 2018 online and in select retail stores.

Isodiol

Outside North America, Q4 2017 saw a number of significant developments in the medical cannabis category, which will likely translate into increased launch activity in 2018. In October 2017, biotech start-up CIITECH announced the availability of Herbalica’s non-psychoactive, cannabidiol supplements to UK consumers via www.essentialcannabinoids.co.uk. The range of 5 supplements includes products for anxiety, ovulation pain and insomnia. The CBD compound is considered a powerful anti-inflammatory and anti-anxiety agent, with researchers suggesting it could ease chronic pain. Israeli-based Herbalica’s parent company HerbalTune has developed and supplied a range of therapeutic, botanical products to the local market for the past three years.

In Asia-Pacific, the New Zealand Government introduced a bill earlier this month to legalise medicinal cannabis in the country. The bill seeks to amend the Misuse of Drugs Act to make a specific exemption for any person with a qualifying medical condition to grow, process or use cannabis plants and products for therapeutic purposes, provided they have support from a registered medical practitioner. The move, which follows Australia’s legalisation of medicinal cannabis in 2016, aims to make the ingredient more readily available for those suffering with chronic pain or terminal illness. At the same time, Australia announced that it aims to become the fourth country after Uruguay, Canada and the Netherlands to legalise exports of medicinal cannabis.

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OTCs in Action Episode 32: ED in NZ, not .com

OTCinActionheaderIllegal internet sales of Rx and OTC drugs, as well as adulterated dietary supplements, put consumers at great risk. “Tainted Sexual Enhancement Products”, published on the FDA’s website, warns consumers:

“The FDA has identified an emerging trend where over-the-counter products, frequently represented as dietary supplements, contain hidden active ingredients that could be harmful. Consumers may unknowingly take products laced with varying quantities of approved prescription drug ingredients, controlled substances, and untested and unstudied pharmaceutically active ingredients. These deceptive products can harm you! Hidden ingredients are increasingly becoming a problem in products promoted for sexual enhancement. Remember, FDA cannot test all products on the market that contain potentially harmful hidden ingredients. Enforcement actions and consumer advisories for tainted products only cover a small fraction of the tainted over-the-counter products on the market.”

Last week, this blog’s sister publication, OTC.NewDirections, reported that an international crackdown on  illegal internet trade of medical products yielded $81.8mn worth of items from 115 different countries, and 156 arrests. In the UK, a record $25.1mn worth of counterfeit and unlicensed medicines and 15,000 devices was seized, including potentially harmful slimming pills, erectile dysfunction, anaemia and narcolepsy tablets. The US FDA took action against 1,050+ websites that illegally sell potentially dangerous, unapproved Rx medicines and medical devices.

In fact, regulators around the world are playing a high stakes game of Whack-a-Mole, a popular arcade game in which players hit cheeky little moles with mallets, but as soon as one is knocked out another appears elsewhere.

WHACK A MOLE_0However, the risky business is driven by consumer demand, and now OTCs are in Action in New Zealand to satisfy those needs safely and legally. One of the more common unapproved ingredients in the FDA’s list of adulterated products is sildenafil, more commonly known by its legal Rx brand name, Viagra. The Rx-to-OTC switch of Silvasta (sildenafil) erectile dysfunction treatment in New Zealand was approved in late 2014. Men aged 35-70 years can purchase Silvasta without an Rx following a screening process with a trained pharmacist. This spring Nicholas Hall & Company awarded Douglas Pharma its top marketing award for the launch of Silvasta. A consumer campaign includes TV ads featuring an “everyday” man explaining that help is at hand from pharmacies without the need to see a doctor, while a pharmacy finder website directs men to the nearest outlet.

Another interesting development that will ensure consumer access to safer drugs is the UK’s new requirement that online medicine sellers must be registered with the Medicines & Healthcare products Regulatory Agency. They must display on every page of their website the new European common logo, which will be linked to their entry in the MHRA’s list of registered online sellers. The medicine being offered online must be licensed in the member state where the purchaser is based, and the seller must be legally entitled to sell medicine in accordance with UK legislation. Registered pharmacies can sell general sales list and pharmacy medicines or supply Rx-only medicines that they have dispensed against a prescription. Other retailers can only sell GSL (self-selection OTC) products. The penalty for disobeying the registration and logo rules is up to two years in prison, a fine or both.

In an somewhat related matter, as it affects consumer safety and appropriate use of OTC medicines by reducing illicit methamphetamine manufacture, Acura Pharmaceuticals has entered into an agreement with OTC cold remedy giant Bayer to license its IMPEDE technology. IMPEDE technology, which is available in the US in Acura’s Nexafed, has demonstrated significantly reduced yields of methamphetamine compared to traditional formulations in lab tests and has been associated with a reduction in meth labs in local markets of up to 90%. OTCs in Action covered the launch of Acura’s Nexafed Sinus Pressure + Pain (pseudoephedrine and acetaminophen) in February.

Episode 17: Outwitting meth manufacturers