BAYER SETS OUT KEY SCIENCE-LED SELF-CARE PRINCIPLES

Bayer’s Science-Led Self-Care: Principles for Best Practice sets out five key principles that should underpin all self-care products improving health & wellness. The paper is intended to spark a conversation within the industry and stakeholders around the need to promote science-led self-care for the benefit of consumers. In the wake of the pandemic and the rise of accessible, digital information, consumers are becoming increasingly interested in maintaining and managing their own health. Enabling this shift means they will need to trust that the choices they make are the best.

Bayer’s five Principles of Science-Led Self-Care are the:

  • Science of the Human: Self-care products rooted in a thorough understanding of human biology, medical insights & unmet needs
  • Science of Regulation: Independent regulation to ensure safety & efficacy through transparent communication, accurate labelling and supported claims
  • Science of Collaboration: Carefully judged collaborations focused on win-win outcomes can help improve access to self-care, making products available more widely and empowering more consumers to take charge of their health
Source: Bayer’s Science-led Self-Care report
  • Science of Discovery: Self-care products that have been rigorously researched, founded on scientific principles & developed with a deep understanding of consumers’ unmet needs
  • Science of the Consumer-Product Experience: A seamless experience beginning with the initial search for information, continuing through to the physical interaction with the product itself that helps better use self-care products

Comment from Bayer CH Chief Scientific Officer, David Evendon-Challis: For many companies like Bayer engaging in science-led self-care, these principles will already be a part of their process. These are what set science-led self-care products apart. We look forward to kicking off a robust discussion with industry peers, health and medical professionals, policy makers and consumers about how these principles can continue to evolve to contribute to better health for all.

Sharpen your skills and develop your understanding of Self-Care at the forthcoming CHC Training Academy workshop in Bucharest on 26 October. This will be followed by a free 1-day conference, hosted by RASCI, focusing on Health Literacy, opened with a keynote speech from Nicholas Hall. To register, or for more information on group booking rates, please contact elizabeth.bernos@NicholasHall.com.

DIGITAL HEALTH LITERACY DILEMMA IN AUSTRALIA

Consumer Healthcare Products Australia’s Self-Care Opportunity Report, which gathered views from 2,000 adults to uncover their knowledge and skills in managing everyday health conditions, has uncovered a significant digital health challenge. Key findings include:

  • 66% of Australians seek information online for common health conditions before consulting a healthcare professional, but 91% do not fully understand the information they find
  • 80% of Millennials go online for healthcare information before seeing a GP or pharmacist, while 47% of Baby Boomers go online as a first port of call
  • 97% feel responsible for managing their own health and 84% want to improve their health skills and knowledge to be more engaged in their health, but 30% consider their health literacy level to be low
  • 81% use health websites, apps or social media to manage common health conditions
Source: CHP Australia’s Self-Care Opportunity Report

Nicholas Hall’s Touchpoints: The latest survey by CHP Australia raises some real concerns about health literacy. As CEO Deon Schoombie comments: “[This] report clearly shows an urgent need to help Australians with digital health literacy – to know where to find, how to interpret and how to use health information from online sources. This is very important as we can clearly see those with higher literacy levels have higher engagement in their health … We have an opportunity now to make a significant difference to our overall national health status by making a greater investment in self-care education, upskilling digital health literacy and creating more verified and easy-to-access digital health sources.”

So, unlike the outlook for the market in 2022, where the evidence is both insubstantial and to an extent contradictory, the message about consumers is clear. If we want consumers to fully participate in self-care, we need to give them access to reliable information with which they can make informed decisions affecting their own health.

Gain valuable tools and techniques to expand your health literacy at the next workshop hosted by the CHC Training Academy, on 26 October in Bucharest! The following day, RASCI will host a free 1-day conference, focusing on Health Literacy — Driving Self-Care Forward, beginning with an exclusive keynote presentation from Nicholas Hall. To register, or for more information on group booking rates, please contact elizabeth.bernos@NicholasHall.com.

App Store trend of 2018: Self-care

OTCINACTION

Apple’s distribution platform for mobile apps, the App Store, recently selected self-care as its trend of the year. Wellness apps designed to encourage healthy habits, improve sleep, reduce anxiety and increase mindfulness have been the major trend on the iOS platform over the past year, according to Apple.

Fittingly, one of these popular apps is called #SelfCare, launched by TRU LUV Media in summer 2018. Designed like a game, the app promotes emotional wellbeing via breathing exercises and other small acts of self-care. Another is called Shine – Self-Care & Meditation, which delivers free daily motivational messages, 5-minute affirmations and meditations, plus tips on how to reduce stress, improve sleep and increase focus.

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The popularity of such apps is good news for OTC marketers, especially those operating in lifestyle and VMS categories that focus on mental wellbeing, i.e. sedatives & sleep aids and herbal memory & brain health. Apple noted that apps for physical health, such as those that track calories and steps, have long been popular with iOS users, but emphasised that this trend towards apps for mental health is a new phenomenon.

That said, what may be somewhat concerning to OTC marketers is that this evolving definition of self-care doesn’t appear to include self-medication. While OTC New Products Tracker lists medical device launches in 2018 that incorporate an accompanying app – such as Nokia Sleep and Natural Cycles, the latter designed to aid conception – supplements or drugs backed by a mobile app are much thinner on the ground.

Review the latest new products hitting the CHC market with OTC New Products Tracker, the ideal competitive intelligence tool. We recently unveiled a major update, with eye-catching new graphs and powerful search filters that help you visualise and explore the vast archive according to your exact requirements. To trial the updated database or for a demo, please contact waisan.lee-gabell@NicholasHall.com