Belfast scientists say aspirin could reverse tooth decay

Aspirin has long been prized for its painkilling properties, while low-dose aspirin is a popular systemic cardiovascular treatment, but new research shows that it could also reverse tooth decay.

According to a BBC report, the effects of tooth decay could potentially be reversed by the use of aspirin and lead to fewer fillings being needed in the future, researchers in Belfast have said. Tooth decay, the most common dental disease, leads to the inflammation of the tooth nerve, causing toothache.

Initial research at Queen’s University found aspirin stimulates stem cells in teeth, enhancing tooth regeneration. Current treatment for tooth decay involves fillings, which may need to be replaced many times during the lifetime of the tooth.

The British Dental Association reported in 2016 that 72% of 15-year-olds in Northern Ireland have dental decay. That figure compared to 44% in England and 63% in Wales.

Screen Shot 2017-09-11 at 12.02.49.png

Teeth naturally have limited regenerative abilities. They can produce a thin band of dentine, the layer just below the enamel, if the inner dental pulp becomes exposed, but this cannot repair a large cavity.

The research findings, to be presented later this week at the British Society for Oral and Dental Research annual conference, show that aspirin can enhance the function of those stem cells, thus helping self-repair by regenerating lost tooth structure.

The researchers collated large amounts of previous research data to identify aspirin as a compound that can induce the gene signature needed to generate new dentine.

 

Advertisements

HIV / AIDS home test kits seized over potential false results

The UK’s Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) has seized 114 Hightop HIV/AIDS Home Test Kits, which could be potentially misleading in providing false results. The agency has advised that anyone who has used the kit should seek a further HIV test at a local sexual health clinic or through a GP.

A statement issued by the MHRA stated: “All UK based stock of Hightop HIV/AIDS Home Test Kit have been seized by MHRA and all sales of the product into the UK market have been stopped by the manufacturer”

The statement continued: “The HIV kits, manufactured by Qingdao Hightop Biotech Co Ltd, do not have a valid CE mark which means the product has not met a number of regulatory requirements concerning test performance, labelling and instructions for use.”

HIV Self test kit photo.jpg

Self-testing kits for HIV became legal in the UK from 6 April 2014, but buyers have always been warned to carefully check the CE mark before purchasing any kit. Self-test kit users who purchase kits online or from the high street should know what they are buying is safe and reliable. MHRA is currently investigating the issue with experts at Public Health England.

John Wilkinson, MHRA’s director of devices commented: “If you are concerned you may have used an unreliable test kit, speak to your GP, sexual health clinic, pharmacist or other healthcare professional”. He further added: “Make sure the kit has a CE mark and clearly states that it is intended for home self-testing. Don’t use a test kit if it’s damaged or the seal is broken.”

MHRA strongly suggests consumers should only buy a self-test kit from a reputable source, such as an online pharmacy registered with the MHRA. In the UK, online pharmacies must be registered with the MHRA and display the European common logo on every page of their website. While home self-test kits for HIV and STIs have many benefits, including letting people test in their own space and on their own terms, there’s equal concern surrounding their use.

According to recent surveys there are more than 100,000 people living with HIV in the UK and around a quarter of them don’t know they’re HIV positive.

Vitamin B3 could prevent miscarriages and birth defects

OTCINACTION

An extra dose of vitamin B3 might help prevent certain kinds of complex birth defects, according to a new study. It is thought the vitamin can help compensate for defects in the body’s ability to make a molecule, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), which researchers have now linked for the first time to healthy fetal development in humans.

Every year 7.9 million babies are born with a birth defect worldwide. The discovery suggests the possibility that boosting levels of B3 in pregnant women’s diets might help lower overall rates of birth defects.

Researchers from the Victor Chang Institute in Sydney called it ‘a double breakthrough’ as they found both a cause and a preventative solution. The researchers analysed the DNA of four families where the mothers had suffered multiple miscarriages or their babies were born with multiple birth defects, such as heart, kidney, vertebrae and cleft palate problems.

They found mutations in two genes that caused the child to be deficient in a vital molecule known as Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), which allows cells to generate energy and organs to develop normally. Lead researcher Prof Sally Dunwoodie replicated these mutations in mice and found they could be corrected if the pregnant mother took niacin (vitamin B3).

“You can boost your levels of NAD and completely prevent the miscarriages and birth defects. It bypasses the genetic problem,” she said. “It’s rare that you find a cause and a prevention in the same study. And the prevention is so simple, it’s a vitamin,” she said.

vitamin

 

Back In 2005, Dunwoodie’s team dealt with a particularly severe case, a baby who had major defects in the heart, backbone, and ribs; the rib problems being so bad that the child’s lungs couldn’t fully inflate. The team found that the family carried a mutation in a gene related to the production of NAD, a molecule crucial for energy storage and DNA synthesis in cells. Both parents carried a mutation in one of their copies of the gene, and the affected baby had inherited two defective copies.

No one had reported any role for NAD in heart or bone development, Dunwoodie says. “We didn’t know what to do with it.”

To confirm the role of the mutations in organ and bone development, the researchers knocked out the two genes in mice to see whether similar birth defects appeared. At first all the pups were normal. But then the researchers realised that standard mouse chow is rich in niacin and that cells can use either niacin or nicotinamide—both known together as vitamin B3—to make NAD by an alternate pathway.

The work opens a potentially exciting new area of research for developmental biologists: Trying to understand how cell metabolism affects development

 

 

More than half of UK’s e-cig users give up tobacco

OTCINACTION

A survey of 12,000 adults for Action on Smoking and Health (ASH) found some 1.5 million vapers are now ex-smokers, compared with 1.3 million who still use tobacco.

However, ASH stated that the message that vaping was much less harmful than smoking was still yet to get through to all smokers. Some 9mn still smoke in the UK despite a big rise in e-cigarette use.

In 2012, there were 700,000 vapers in the UK; now there are 2.9mn. The main reason ex-smokers give for vaping is to help them stop smoking. Current smokers say they do it principally to reduce the amount they smoke.

Scientists say evidence suggests that the risks of exposure to toxins for e-cigarette users are likely to be low – and much lower than with tobacco.

Deborah Arnott, the campaigning health charity’s chief executive, said the figures on vapers who had quit smoking were “excellent news” but added that the rate of people switching to electronic versions had peaked. “The rapid growth in e-cigarette use has come to an end,” she said.

This is owing to more than a third of smokers having still never tried e-cigarettes, as a result of concerns about their safety and addictiveness. However, research suggests that 26% of people think e-cigarettes are more – or as equally – harmful as smoking tobacco while only 13% believe they are a lot less harmful.

“It’s very important smokers realise that vaping is much, much less harmful than smoking,” Arnott continued.

People who combine electronic and standard cigarette smoking are still being exposed to the cancer-causing substances in tobacco smoke, increasing their risk of lung cancers, bronchitis and other diseases, although Public Health England believes levels of nicotine in e-cigarettes are unlikely to pose any significant health risk.

New Test Launched in European HIV Testing Week

OTCinActionheader

In its fourth year, and the second time hepatitis testing has been included, European HIV Testing Week is currently in action. Starting on 18th November, and finishing a week later, testing week is spanning the length and breadth of the continent with partners participating from over 50 European countries.

Prior to this, the world’s fastest HIV self-test kit went on sale last week in order to relieve pressure on overcrowded sexual health clinics.

bioLytical Laboratories, renowned for their production of rapid infectious disease tests, has developed the INSTI HIV Self Test, following research revealing that over 103,000 people are living with HIV in the UK and an estimated 18,100 remain unaware of their positive status.

Insti-HIV-selft-test.jpg

It was reported recently that funding cuts have resulted in clinic closures across the country meaning the pressure is on for remaining clinics. Failure to fund routine testing in GP surgeries is leading to late diagnosis when early treatment of the disease is highly beneficial.

With one prick to a finger and a droplet of blood, the INSTI HIV Self Test provides immediate results and is over 99% accurate. Other home testing kits can take up to 20 minutes to produce a result, and in some cases laboratory test results can take several days or weeks.

The INSTI HIV Self Test kit also includes a resource card on where to seek help or for those who have general questions on HIV screening.

The test is available now online at www.INSTI-HIVSelfTest.com and costs €29.95 (£25.95) per kit.

Vit D recommended for all

OTCinActionheader

A report by a committee of independent nutrition experts has recommended that everyone in the UK should take vitamin D supplements. This has been advised despite the initial thought that only certain groups of the population should take the supplement.

The new guidance advice, which applies to England and Wales, suggests that everyone over the age of four should take 10mcg of vitamin D everyday. The guidance advice also suggests that during the chillier seasons this is particularly advised.

Vitamin D Pills(1)

The report strongly suggests that pregnant and breastfeeding women, people from ethnic minority groups with dark skin, elderly people in care homes and those who wear clothing that covers a majority of the skin, should take 10mcg of vitamin D everyday all year round.

The Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN) looked at the issue and decided that, to ensure a majority of the population has enough vitamin D in their blood all year round, daily intake is advisable.

For pregnant women and some children up to and including the age of four, the supplements will be free under the government’s ‘Healthy Start’ scheme. The Department of Health will now have to decide whether to fund free supplements for other groups of the population.

Official estimates suggest one in five adults and one in six children in England may have low levels of the vitamin in their bodies.

Prince Harry gets pricked publicly; Faster OTC HIV test approved

Last Thursday, people all over the world watched the UK’s Prince Harry get his finger pricked when he streamed his HIV test, conducted in a clinic, live on Facebook.

 

People who prefer a less public test will benefit from bioLytical Laboratories’ new INSTI HIV Self Test, which was approved last week by the EU and will be available in retail and e-commerce sites by the fourth quarter of this year. According to bioLytical, INSTI is the world’s fastest HIV Self Test, providing instant results with just one drop of blood. The at-home test reportedly yields greater than 99% accuracy.

Getting tested for HIV is the first step in taking control of one’s health and preventing transmission to others, and it is a step that can be the hardest to take, according to healthcare professionals. “It’s amazing how quick it is,” said Harry about his bioLytical HIV test (negative), performed at the Burrell Street Sexual Health Centre in South London. “Once you get people through the door, that’s the hardest bit out of the way.”

“Accessibility, inconvenience, anxiety, lack of awareness, stigma and discrimination are some of the reasons why a person may hesitate to take an HIV test,” noted Rick Galli, Chief Technical Officer of bioLytical Laboratories, “and this is exactly why we commend Prince Harry’s efforts towards the cause.”

OTCs in Action also commends bioLytical Laboratories for its efforts to improve HIV testing in public and private.